Agile is not a methodology, it’s an Albatross…

One of the hardest things to understand when starting out on the Agile journey, is that although most often sold as a methodology, this is looking at it at the wrong way. Scrum is a methodology, as is Kanban or DSDM or XP. But none of these are Agile itself.

The problem is that often the first experience of anything termed Agile are the methods and tools of a particular methodology. It’s how I was first introduced to it. The methods and tools however are of no benefit in and of themselves. Yes, they can help uncover issues in your current process, Yes they may have some use in helping frame agile in your mind. But this is really of limited value, as a new set of tools is not the answer to a dysfunctional organisation or industry. Frankly that’s fiddling whilst Rome burns. A methodology is not meaningful unless accompanied by a change in mindset, without that you’re just going through the motions.

The problem with Agile today is the word Agile has baggage. So much so that it is pretty much meaningless. If I asked a room full of people, who thought they knew what Agile was, what the term Agile meant, a large portion would describe a methodology (which it isn’t) and the others would probably all give me conflicting answers.

If Agile is not a methodology and it’s not really got a definition – what use is it as term?

The language and the terms we use, help define and bind us as a group. Shared terms, shared understanding, shared beliefs.

So the real meaning of Agile (if we can reclaim the term from the methodologists) is that it is the expression of a collective mindset. A shared set of values if you will. Are those values the ones defined in the Agile manifesto? I don’t think so. I think the mindset and values are evolving and we’re yet to see anything close to a definitive set of values. That’s why we need a collective term to represent and be the vessel for the inchoate and evolving values.

The language we use and the definitions that they collectively hold are important. Shared language is what defines the groups that we belong to. That the word Agile is now so laden with baggage that it has lost its meaning is perhaps a symptom of a deeper underlying issue. An expression of a community that no longer has a shared vision or language.

A community that is becoming so myopic and fixated on the methodology and tools that it is losing its collective vision. In its place a morass of commercial vendors competing to reduce Agile to a packaged and marketable commodity.

Like the term Free software morphing to open source isn’t it time to define a new shared language and reclaim the essence of Agile without the methodology?

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